Browsing articles in "Journalism Education"

ieiMedia faculty to chat on Twitter about studying abroad

Oct 14, 2016   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Advice From the Pros, Announcements, Blog, IEI Media in the News, International Reporting, Journalism Education, Social Media  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.
MediaShift_logoThree ieiMedia faculty will participate next week in an #EdShift chat, “Learning Digital Skills on Study-Abroad Programs,” sponsored by MediaShift.

The hourlong chat will start at 1 p.m. Eastern time/noon Central/11 a.m. Mountain/10 a.m. Pacific on Oct. 18. You can find it by searching for the #EdShift Twitter hashtag.

Rachele Kanigel, co-director of ieiMedia’s new Kyoto program, Steve Listopad, director of the Oslo program and Spring Semester in Urbino, and Amara Aguilar, who teaches in ieiMedia’s Valencia program, will participate. Other guests include Vivian Martin of Central Connecticut State University, Andrea Frantz of Buena Vista University,  Meggie Morris of Northwestern University, Kim Fox of American University in Cairo, and John Schrader of California State University-Long Beach. Stacy Forster of the University of Wisconsin-Madison will moderate the chat.

Kanigel, an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University, has led ieiMedia programs in Perpignan, France; Urbino, Italy; and Jerusalem and taught in the Cagli program. Aguilar, an associate professor of professional practice in digital journalism at the University of Southern California, taught in ieiMedia’s Valencia program in 2015 and 2016.

Former ieiMedia students and those considering our 2017 programs are encouraged to attend the Twitter chat and share experiences and questions about studying digital journalism abroad.

UPDATE: A Storify recap of the conversation was posted on MediaShift after the chat. Read it here.

Urbino grad gets a dream job

Oct 20, 2015   //   by Susan West   //   Alumni News, Blog, Journalism Education, Urbino, Italy  //  No Comments
Susan West is an award-winning writer and editor who launches and advises magazines and websites. With an M.S. in science journalism from the University of Missouri at Columbia, West started her career as a staff writer at Science News and Science 80. In 1986, she co-founded a popular health magazine called Hippocrates (now known as Health and owned by Time Inc.), which won four National Magazine Awards during her tenure.

Urbino Program alum Autumn Morowitz recently began working for NBC Olympics.

Urbino Program Alum Autumn Morowitz (2013) has just landed a plum position: Production Assistant for NBC Sports, covering the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Says Autumn:”I’m falling more in love with the job each and every day.”

If you’ve met Autumn, it’s easy to understand how she wound up at NBC, her first “real” job since graduating in May from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Autumn majored in Media Arts and Design at JMU with an emphasis in Corporate Communication and a minor in Human Resources and Development—a practical curriculum that would have given her many options in the job market. But she also loves sports, and through a summer internship at Hersam Acorn Newspapers in Connecticut; more than two years at MadiZone, JMU’s online sports outlet; and an internship at a Harrisonburg TV station, she found she had a knack for sports news and a passion for broadcast.

 In Urbino, Italy, she showed a determination, focus, and resourcefulness that quickly overcame the cultural, language, and logistical barriers that can often stymie students in the program. Armed only with the information that the best peaches in the region reputedly come from an area near the town of Montelabbate, she made her way to the town by local bus without the help of a translator and talked to anyone who would listen until she found a family of fifth-generation peach farmers. Then she returned, again and again, to flesh out their story and bring it to life.

Her multimedia story package about the Marchionni family won a 2013 Raffie Award for best text and was nominated for two other categories. The Urbino faculty knew that Autumn was destined for great things. Now, though her contract prevents her from discussing the specifics of her new job, we thought she might have some advice for others who would like to follow a similar path.

IeiMedia: What do you think are the most important skills or experience for media students to acquire?

Autumn Morowitz: The most important skill for media students to acquire is storytelling. Whether you are a cameraperson, director, producer, editor or broadcaster, your main goal is to tell a story. The audience needs to be engaged, needs to feel something, needs to care about what is being said all through your actions and your decisions. If there is no story, there is no reason for anyone to watch. Take those English courses seriously. Take journalism courses when you can even if that’s not your major because sharpening those skills will matter all throughout your life.

IM: Have any of the skills you worked on or acquired in Urbino come in handy?

AM: The skills I was able to work on in Urbino would come in handy for any position. You work hard in Urbino and pour your heart and time into the pieces you create so that you are very proud of your final product. Being in a different country provides obstacles that you have to overcome and in turn makes you a stronger worker. It is such a great experience!

IM: Anything else you want to share with aspiring ieiMedia students?

AM: Challenge yourself and take that obstacle head on. Even though a task may seem daunting, you’re going to come out on the other side as a better worker. Every little challenge is a step, and every little step gets you closer to your goal. You don’t just wake up one morning at the top of the ladder, you have to take each little step to get there so make those steps count and enjoy them at the same time.

See what other ieiMedia alums are up to.

 

IeiMedia Invites Applicants for Faculty Research Fellowships, Summer 2016

Sep 29, 2015   //   by Andy Ciofalo   //   Blog, International Reporting, Journalism Education, Research Fellows, Study Abroad  //  No Comments
Andy Ciofalo (ieiMedia Founder and President) is professor emeritus of communication/ journalism at Loyola College Maryland, where he arrived in 1983 to found what is now The Communication Department.

The Institute for Education in International Media (ieiMedia) invites communications faculty at accredited American colleges and universities to apply for Research Fellowships at its 2016 summer media programs in Croatia, France, Israel, Italy, Northern Ireland, Norway, and Spain.

Accepted Research Fellows will receive a $3,000 grant toward the $4,995 cost of a program and will have access to all the amenities of the program site. Non-participating spouses are welcome at a cost of $1,200 for four weeks; children, unfortunately, are not allowed. Fellows will pay their own airfare and insurance.

Research Fellows will have regular informal access to the program faculty for pedagogical and theoretical exchanges. In addition, they will participate in one or more of the program’s teaching modules and will serve as a resource to faculty and students where appropriate. We have created these opportunities in response to many queries from comm faculty interested in investigating the techniques and effectiveness of experiential learning, boot-camp teaching, short-term programs, and intercultural reporting.

In 2014, our first Research Fellow, Barry Janes, professor of communication at Rider University, participated in the Urbino Program, where he assisted in the video module and advised students on their projects. He returned in 2015 as a full faculty member.

This summer, the Urbino Program hosted two Faculty Fellows, Sonya DiPalma, assistant professor of public relations at University of North Carolina, and Suzanne Popovich Chandler, assistant professor in creative media and broadcast electronic media at University of Oklahoma. In addition, Jack Zibluk, professor of mass media at Southeast Missouri State University, joined the team of the Istanbul Program as a Fellow.

Jack Zibluk

Research Fellow Jack Zibluk worked with Istanbul students on photojournalism.

Says Zibluk, “The ieiMedia Fellowship was the best of several worlds. It offered me the flexibility to study and conduct research as well as to develop my own multimedia skills under the supervision of some of the top people in the world. The Istanbul fellowship was like a graduate school for foreign correspondents, and I even did some photojournalism work that an agency purchased for worldwide distribution. I can’t say enough about the program and the people with whom I worked.”

Istanbul Program Director Mary D’Ambrosio, assistant professor of practice at Rutgers University, agrees: “A faculty fellowship is a great way to learn about teaching abroad, and to have an opportunity to contribute one’s own expertise to an international program.”

Suzanne Chandler, Susan Biddle, and Marie Gould

Research Fellow Suzanne Chandler (right) with photo instructor Susan Biddle (center) and faculty spouse Marie Gould (left) at the Urbino Program's welcome reception.

Chandler, who studies how 21st century students learn, came to Urbino to find out more about the total-immersion, experiential methods used in our study-abroad courses. She is now creating a short film about the student experience in the Urbino Program.

“As a Fellow, while observing the vast experience assembled in Urbino,” she says, “I knew students would learn photography, writing, video, and magazine production. What I did not anticipate was the extent they would grow not only as truly gifted multimedia journalists producing amazing work, but also as adult citizens of a global economy, as individuals with curiosity who embrace and appreciate the similarities as well as diversities among us.” 

DiPalma interviewed Urbino students for a research paper tentatively titled “Experiential Learning in a Foreign Culture,” which she will submit to the 2016 AEJMC Southeast Colloquium. “IeiMedia provides the ultimate faculty development experience for learning how to teach the three components of a multimedia package–text, photo story and video story,” she says. “Take advantage of the opportunity to revitalize your application courses through in-depth conversations with professionals from both academia and the media.”

Sonya DiPalma

Research Fellow Sonya DiPalma (left), with faculty Rusty Greene (middle) and Doug Cumming (right), addresses Urbino students during orientation.

To apply: Email me at aciofalo@ieimedia.com to explain your interest in this opportunity and how it might have an impact on your teaching or administrative role. If there is a particular research question you plan to address, please describe that. Include with the email your vita, a letter of recommendation from your unit head, and a sample of or link to your writing, other work or research. We expect a written reflection at the end that you may also share with your department.

Two Photojournalism Students Win Foley Awards

Mar 11, 2015   //   by Susan West   //   International Reporting, Jerusalem, Israel, Journalism Education, Photography & Photojournalism, Scholarships, Urbino, Italy  //  No Comments
Susan West is an award-winning writer and editor who launches and advises magazines and websites. With an M.S. in science journalism from the University of Missouri at Columbia, West started her career as a staff writer at Science News and Science 80. In 1986, she co-founded a popular health magazine called Hippocrates (now known as Health and owned by Time Inc.), which won four National Magazine Awards during her tenure.

Two talented young photographers are the first recipients of ieiMedia’s James Foley Memorial Scholarship in International Photojournalism, established in honor of the photojournalist who was tragically executed last August while covering the war in Syria.

World Cup 2014, Mexico City. By Manuel Orbegozo

World Cup 2014, Mexico City. By Manuel Orbegozo

Manuel J. Orbegozo, a senior at Humboldt State University in Arcata, California, received a $5,000 scholarship to attend the Urbino program. In 2012, Orbegozo worked as a photographer and writer at “Siete,” a weekly magazine based in Lima, Peru. There, he founded Azotea, a citizen journalism site that covered the capital’s political and cultural life. He is currently editor-in-chief of El Leñador, focused on the Latino community in Humboldt County. In his scholarship application, Orbegozo wrote, “As a college journalist, I realized that my degree could be achieved in a classroom, while my overall skills could only be refined through an experience abroad.”

Flood Wall Street direct action. By Emily Teague

Flood Wall Street direct action. By Emily Teague

Emily Teague, a freshman at California State University in Chico, received a $2,000 grant to attend the Jerusalem program. While still in high school, Teague was hired as a photojournalist for Chico State’s award-winning newspaper, The Orion. She was named “Best Photographer” on The Orion’s staff, and won fifth place in a national photojournalism competition at the Associated Collegiate Press. In September 2014 she photographed at the front lines of the “Flood Wall Street” direct action and at environmental protests in New York, Pittsburgh, and throughout California. She’s spending this semester traveling and photographing in Europe.

“We were impressed with the high level of work in many of the submissions,” says Dennis Chamberlin, photography instructor in the Urbino Program and a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist. Chamberlin and photo instructors Susan Biddle and Robert Reeder reviewed the applicants. “It was difficult for the jury to choose only one winner because there were several portfolios that were quite strong.”

In Urbino, Orbegozo will study with Chamberlin and Susan Biddle, former Washington Post staff photographer and White House photographer. In Jerusalem, Teague will work with Linda Gradstein, formerly of National Public Radio; Ilene Prusher of The Jerusalem Post; and Cathy Shafran, who has worked in the Jerusalem bureaus of ABC, CNN, Associated Press Television News, Britain’s ITN, and Canada’s CTV.

“This has been a successful inaugural program for this scholarship,” says ieiMedia president and founder Andrew Ciofalo. “We will continue to offer it next year as part of our commitment to emphasizing the importance of photojournalism in our program. The excellence of our applicants this year resulted in our establishing the Foley Grant in the amount of $2,000 for distinguished runners up. We plan to continue this grant as well.”

Four Research Fellows Join IeiMedia Summer Programs

Mar 11, 2015   //   by Susan West   //   Istanbul, Turkey, Journalism Education, Nice, France, Research Fellows, Urbino, Italy, Valencia, Spain  //  No Comments
Susan West is an award-winning writer and editor who launches and advises magazines and websites. With an M.S. in science journalism from the University of Missouri at Columbia, West started her career as a staff writer at Science News and Science 80. In 1986, she co-founded a popular health magazine called Hippocrates (now known as Health and owned by Time Inc.), which won four National Magazine Awards during her tenure.

For summer 2015, ieiMedia welcomes four Research Fellows who will investigate the techniques and effectiveness of experiential learning, boot-camp teaching, short-term programs, and intercultural reporting in our programs in Urbino, Italy; Istanbul, Turkey; Valencia, Spain; and Nice, France.

The 2015 ieiMedia Research Fellows are:

Frank GarlandIn Urbino: Frank Garland, Journalism Communications Program director at Gannon University, Erie, Pennsylvania

Jack ZiblukIn Istanbul: Jack Zibluk, Professor of Mass Media at Southeast Missouri State, Cape Girardeau, Missouri

Kanina HolmesIn Valencia: Kanina Holmes, Assistant Professor of Journalism at Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario

Sonya DiPalmaIn Nice: Sonya DiPalma, Assistant Professor of Mass Communications, University of North Carolina,  Asheville

Research Fellows receive a $3,000 grant toward the $4,995 cost of our programs and will have regular informal access to the program faculty for pedagogical and theoretical exchanges. In addition, they will participate in one or more of the program’s practice modules and become a resource to faculty and students where appropriate. IeiMedia launched the Research Fellows program in 2014, when Barry Janes, professor of communication at Rider University, joined the team of the Urbino Program, where he participated in the video module and advised students in their projects.

“Our four awards this year mark a high point for this program,” says ieiMedia president and founder Andrew Ciofalo. “Our objective is to approve one for each or our seven programs. We will continue this because there is a need for exposing faculty to the value and methods of experiential teaching, especially in foreign settings where it is most effective.”

Our programs in Jerusalem, Israel, and Florence, Italy, remain open until April 1 for Research Fellowship applicants.

To apply: Write to Prof. Andrew Ciofalo, 4195 Tamiami Trail South #102, Venice FL 34293-5112. Explain your interest in this opportunity and how it might have an impact on your teaching or administrative role. If there is a particular research question you plan to address, please let us know. Include with the letter your vita, a letter of recommendation from your unit head, and a sample of or link to your writing, other work or research. We expect a written reflection at the end that you may also share with your department.

A Jesuit-based Model for Experiential Learning

Feb 3, 2015   //   by Andy Ciofalo   //   Craft of Writing, Journalism Education, Non-fiction Journalism, Study Abroad  //  No Comments
Andy Ciofalo (ieiMedia Founder and President) is professor emeritus of communication/ journalism at Loyola College Maryland, where he arrived in 1983 to found what is now The Communication Department.

While ieiMedia is a non-denominational institute, its educational approach is better understood within the context of Ignatian philosophy that informs education at Jesuit universities. I am Professor Emeritus at Loyola University (Maryland), where I taught journalism for 27 years.

The ideals of Jesuit education involve engaging the world and the development of the whole person. Initiative, professionalism and citizenship—all fully graded components in ieiMedia summer programs abroad—are among the hallmarks of experiential learning that support the education of the whole person beyond the mere acquisition of media skills. Applied ethics underlies all student decisions and actions in an experiential learning environment. I believe that from the get go, students should be exposed to Joseph Pulitzer’s dictum, still found on the masthead of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, that places the practice of journalism at the service of those who have no voices in the halls of power. This is the secular root of all liberal journalism which intertwines very nicely with the “peace and justice” perspective we find threaded throughout Jesuit education today.

In field-based practica, the classroom gives way very early on to a collegial relationship between teacher and student, mimicking the relationship between editor and writer. Within that context the educational process becomes very individualized and uses the student’s mistakes and errors not to punish him but to exploit “learning opportunities”—the very essence of experiential learning.

Process courses, such as writing and reporting, usually work best when students are liberated from the inhibiting environment of the classroom. As long as the professor expounds from the front of the classroom, the student is kept in a receptive mode rather than interactive, regardless of how Socratic the method may be. Switching into a collegial mode accelerates learning at the cognitive level and, most importantly, reinforces the student’s self-awareness and ergo self-confidence. Launching the student on an inner journey of self discovery enables every aspect of cura personalis (care for the whole person).

In the typical lecture/discussion course, the opening salvo of overarching ideas and principles does little to foster the interactive learning environment. Thrusting students right into the fray, giving them the courage to make mistakes, builds the experiential skeleton which can later be fleshed out with theoretical concepts. When the professor and the student share a common experiential base, abstract discussions of principles and theory (including behaviors) are more cognitively effective.

In teaching long-form writing courses, the tendency is to start with various professional and literary models which through osmosis and analysis are supposed to inform the students’ understanding of what he is supposed to do. The fact is, the analysis will be better later on after the student has personally experienced the process and begun to find his own voice rather than mimic other voices.

My approach is to use a series of exercises to develop the building blocks students will need before creating their own narrative. At this stage, students need feedback and not a grade. In fact, it is the repetitive act of writing that activates new neural pathways to creativity. Peer learning is important at this stage because shared work shows how others are approaching the exact same material. This accelerates the learning process and reduces the number of writing tasks required to bring students to a common level of performance and understanding.

In the narrative stage, the role of the professor/colleague is to reference the text to the building blocks and ask the student to assess his own performance and do any necessary rewrites to enrich the various parts, sentence by sentence. At the same time, the student assesses his text to determine if it has met his objectives and if those objectives are of any value to the audience, and if not, how to reorganize to accomplish that goal. In many writing courses, it is one first draft, one rewrite and out. In experiential learning, one directs the student to restructure the narrative one step at a time (e.g., “This is good so far; now go back and add [this]”). A student’s achievement is best measured not by grading multiple articles based on a truncated two-step process; two narratives are all that is needed—a first narrative that is the product of multiple drafts, and a second narrative that is not subjected to a guided drafting process.

Building from the bottom up, that is the essence of Jesuit pedagogy.

Meet Up With ieiMedia in Philadelphia

Oct 10, 2014   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   International Reporting, Journalism Education, Study Abroad  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

College Media 2014 logo

If you’re planning to attend the Associated Collegiate Press/College Media Association National College Media Convention in Philadelphia Oct. 27-Nov. 2 and you or your students are interested in summer journalism study-abroad programs, you can meet with ieiMedia faculty at the convention.

IeiMedia program participants don’t just study abroad; they report on a community and then produce stories and videos for multimedia websites and digital magazines (see examples from last year’s programs in Northern Ireland, Italy, Israel, Spain, France, and Turkey.)

For summer 2015, ieiMedia is offering six international learning adventures:

Our programs are open to students and recent graduates from all schools. Over the past 12 years, ieiMedia has brought more than 600 students from more than 80 public and private schools abroad. 

You can find out more about ieiMedia and meet some of the faculty during two presentations at the college media convention:

Don’t Just See the World, Cover It!

Friday, 9-9:50 a.m., Salon A, level 5

Do you fantasize about becoming a foreign correspondent? Hope to study abroad? Want to sharpen your multimedia savvy by covering some of the world’s most rural areas? Find out about work and study-abroad opportunities for students interested in media and journalism. See how you can enhance your professional skills, learn about culture and compassion and put a global spin on your resume that will give you a competitive edge as you launch your career.

Rachele Kanigel and Ida Mojadad, San Francisco State University

Dan Reimold, St. Joseph’s University

Jeff Brody, California State University, Fullerton

 

Foreign Correspondence and Student Media

Saturday, 2-2:50 p.m., Room 413, Level 4 

Learn about students’ international reporting experiences, opportunities to practice international journalism in 2015, and how to incorporate international reporting into our student media program.

Steve Listopad, Valley City State University

 

Or you can contact one of the ieiMedia faculty attending the convention:

Application Deadline: February 1, 2015. Students should apply as early as possible since admission is on a rolling basis. (Programs with available space will accept applications until March 30). Applications are available online.

This year ieiMedia is sponsoring the James Foley Memorial Scholarship in International Photojournalism in honor of the journalist tragically executed while covering the war in Syria. The winner of the $5,000 scholarship will attend our program in Urbino, Italy, to study with our award-winning photography faculty.

Hope to see you in Philadelphia!

Who is ieiMedia?

Oct 6, 2014   //   by Andy Ciofalo   //   International Reporting, Journalism Education  //  No Comments
Andy Ciofalo (ieiMedia Founder and President) is professor emeritus of communication/ journalism at Loyola College Maryland, where he arrived in 1983 to found what is now The Communication Department.

Bob Marshall, a Pulitzer Prize winning environmental reporter, is just one of the highly experienced members of ieiMedia's faculty.

An academic program is only as good as its faculty, which accounts for ieiMedia being the nation’s leading independent deliverer of international programs for journalism and communications students. Check out our faculty roster and you’ll see what I mean.

As an experiential program, our faculty is a healthy mix of 15 professionals (including two Pulitzer Prize winners, two National Magazine Award winners, and two winners of Overseas Press Club awards) and 29 academics, most tenured at various universities. The academics, who also have significant professional credentials such as Emmys, a Nieman fellowship, a George Polk award, and awards from the AP, UPI, and the Society of Professional Journalists, come from 21 universities.

As you peruse our staff roster, take note of a few names:

  • Steve Anderson (James Madison University) designs and manages our web page in addition to directing the Urbino Program.
  • Michael Gold (West Gold Editorial) manages our email marketing campaign to our own list of 6,000+ communications faculty and administrators. He is a National Magazine Award winner and also teaches in Urbino.
  • Susan West (West Gold Editorial and the Food & Environment Reporting Network) manages our blog and teaches in Urbino. She has won a National Magazine Award and a Lowell Thomas award for best travel magazine.
  • Rachele Kanigel (San Francisco State University) is the former Executive Director of ieiMedia and has taught in Urbino, Perpignan, and Jerusalem.
  • Bob Marshall (our most senior instructor) is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, as is Dennis Chamberlin (Iowa State University). Both teach in our Urbino Program.
  • Terri Ciofalo (University of Illinois) heads our Armagh Program and is a theater specialist.

Others to note are include:

  • Michael Dorsher (University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire), Nice Program
  • Jeff Brody (California State University Fullerton), Valencia Program
  • Mary D’Ambrosio (Central Connecticut State), Istanbul Program
  • Cathy Shafran (Oakland University), Jerusalem Program

First year hires at the Institute for Education in International Media are considered instructors; those who teach two to five years are Institute Fellows. The Senior Fellow designation goes to anyone with ieiMedia for five years or more.

10 Tips for Taking Students Abroad

Oct 6, 2014   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   International Reporting, Journalism Education, Study Abroad  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.
Student journalists worked with interpreters

Student journalists worked with interpreters to cover summer 2013 demonstrations in Istanbul's Taksim Square.

Excerpted from “10 Tips for Training the Next Generation of Foreign Correspondents,” which appeared on the PBS education blog Mediashift on June 30, 2014.

Want to lead your own study-abroad program? Here are some tips:

1-Start early. It can take a year or more to make all the arrangements necessary for a faculty-led study-abroad program. You and the administrators you work with will have to arrange lodging, meeting or classroom space, transportation, guest speakers, tours, insurance, academic credit, possibly interpreters, and at least some meals.

2-Find an in-country partner. Look for a university or language school or a media, government or non-governmental organization based in the country that can help you work out the logistics. To start, search the web for other study-abroad programs based in the region you want to visit. Send out feelers to organizations that might want to work with you or help you find local partners.

3-Work with your international programs office and other administrators.  Foreign travel makes college administrators nervous. Be prepared to fill out a lot of forms and get approval from multiple university bureaucrats before you can take a group of students out of the country. Double- and triple-check that you’ve gotten all the proper permissions and submitted all the necessary paperwork long before your departure date.

4-Plan orientation activities. Walking tours and scavenger hunts are good ways to help students get acquainted with a city, and small-group activities will help students get to know each other quickly.

5-Make contact with local news organizations. Try to arrange a tour of a local (or international) newspaper, news website, or TV or radio station or invite media professionals to speak to your group. Sometimes you can even arrange for students to shadow a reporter or do a mini-internship. Find out if the media organizations will consider publishing your students’ work. A local press club or journalism organization may also be of help.

6-Be flexible. While you need a concrete and carefully planned itinerary, be open to opportunities that may arise. And be ready to make a shift if things fall through, as they often do.

7-Line up cultural activities. Even if you’re planning a rigorous academic program, be sure to arrange for some fun stuff that will help students get a sense of the local culture – a cooking, dance or craft lesson; tours of local attractions; food or wine tastings; music and theatre performances; etc.

8-Keep them busy. College students visiting foreign countries have a tendency to drink, sometimes heavily. Those under 21 often want to take full advantage of the more liberal alcohol policies in the country they are visiting. Plan plenty of stimulating evening activities so students don’t spend every night at the local pub or bar.

9-But don’t overschedule. The biggest complaint I’ve gotten from students is that they don’t have enough downtime. Build free time into the schedule, so students can explore on their own or just hang out.

10-Be ready to play Mom (or Dad). When you’re leading a study-abroad program, you’re much more than an instructor. Be prepared to deal with medical emergencies, broken hearts, homesickness, roommate conflicts, love triangles and other challenges. Pack a first-aid kit and a box of tissues. You’re bound to need them.

For Summer 2015: Six Great Chances to Study Abroad

Oct 3, 2014   //   by Andy Ciofalo   //   International Reporting, Internships, Israel, Istanbul, Turkey, Jerusalem, Israel, Journalism Education, Multimedia, Multiplatform Journalism, Photography & Photojournalism, Scholarships, Study Abroad, Urbino, Italy, Video  //  No Comments
Andy Ciofalo (ieiMedia Founder and President) is professor emeritus of communication/ journalism at Loyola College Maryland, where he arrived in 1983 to found what is now The Communication Department.
Urbino Students

Multimedia students in Urbino, Italy.

 

“To be a reporter in Istanbul is to drop into the middle of the action.”

“This has been much more than a chance to live in Italy for a month–it’s been a chance to learn and apply valuable information that will make me more equipped for a professional career in media production.”

“I learned that journalism is so much more than disseminating news. It’s linking people from opposite sides of the world through a core human interest.”

These are the voices of ieiMedia’s 2014 students, who traveled this past summer to France, Spain, Italy, Turkey, and Northern Ireland to study multimedia journalism, narrative journalism, social media, international reporting, and creative writing. They produced videos, made photos, and reported and wrote about everything from flamenco and truffles to Syrian women in Turkey and the tension in Hebron.

Now we’re looking forward to next summer’s courses and to a new crop of equally inspired–and inspiring–students. And we’re hoping that your students, and perhaps you, will join us.

For summer 2015, we offer six international learning adventures:

In addition, we are proud to announce ieiMedia’s James Foley Memorial Scholarship in International Photojournalism in honor of the journalist tragically executed while covering the war in Syria. The winner of the $5,000 scholarship will attend our program in Urbino, Italy, to study with our award-winning photography faculty, including Pulitzer prize winner Dennis Chamberlin and former White House photographer Susan Biddle.

Keep in mind that our application deadline is February 1, 2015. Applications are considered on a rolling basis, and will close as each program is filled. Apply early to secure a spot!

Please share this information with your students, colleagues, and friends.

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Students Say...

Spending four weeks in Urbino has been a phenomenal experience. I find myself walking down the cobblestone hills, in awe of my surroundings as people pass by, laughing and talking and living their lives. This is the most photogenic place that I’ve ever been in, yet I still feel as though it’s impossible to capture the beauty in this town through a lens. The very air breathes history and sentiment that exceeds all expectation.
by Kendall Gilman, James Madison University, Urbino Project 2015