Browsing articles in "Jerusalem, Israel"

Scholarships available for ieiMedia Jerusalem program

Mar 28, 2017   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Blog, Israel, Jerusalem, Israel, Scholarships  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

The Rothberg International School at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem has generously offered scholarships for students enrolled in ieiMedia’s international reporting program in Jerusalem.

All U.S. citizens are eligible for scholarships of $750. Students who have already filed a FAFSA application can apply to receive an additional scholarship of up to $1,000, for a total scholarship of $1,750 toward the cost of the program. Students of other nationalities may inquire about other scholarships that may be available.

To apply for one of the scholarships, send an email to Ilene Prusher at iprusher@ieimedia.com with your name, email address and phone number and state whether you are applying for just the $750 scholarship or the additional $250 need-based scholarship as well. Students applying for a need-based scholarship will need to add the Hebrew University code of G04012 to their FAFSA application.

The online application for all ieiMedia programs is available on the ieiMedia website. 

For more information, contact Ilene Prusher at iprusher@ieimedia.com or 561-297-6265.

Two Photojournalism Students Win Foley Awards

Mar 11, 2015   //   by Susan West   //   International Reporting, Jerusalem, Israel, Journalism Education, Photography & Photojournalism, Scholarships, Urbino, Italy  //  No Comments
Susan West is an award-winning writer and editor who launches and advises magazines and websites. With an M.S. in science journalism from the University of Missouri at Columbia, West started her career as a staff writer at Science News and Science 80. In 1986, she co-founded a popular health magazine called Hippocrates (now known as Health and owned by Time Inc.), which won four National Magazine Awards during her tenure.

Two talented young photographers are the first recipients of ieiMedia’s James Foley Memorial Scholarship in International Photojournalism, established in honor of the photojournalist who was tragically executed last August while covering the war in Syria.

World Cup 2014, Mexico City. By Manuel Orbegozo

World Cup 2014, Mexico City. By Manuel Orbegozo

Manuel J. Orbegozo, a senior at Humboldt State University in Arcata, California, received a $5,000 scholarship to attend the Urbino program. In 2012, Orbegozo worked as a photographer and writer at “Siete,” a weekly magazine based in Lima, Peru. There, he founded Azotea, a citizen journalism site that covered the capital’s political and cultural life. He is currently editor-in-chief of El Leñador, focused on the Latino community in Humboldt County. In his scholarship application, Orbegozo wrote, “As a college journalist, I realized that my degree could be achieved in a classroom, while my overall skills could only be refined through an experience abroad.”

Flood Wall Street direct action. By Emily Teague

Flood Wall Street direct action. By Emily Teague

Emily Teague, a freshman at California State University in Chico, received a $2,000 grant to attend the Jerusalem program. While still in high school, Teague was hired as a photojournalist for Chico State’s award-winning newspaper, The Orion. She was named “Best Photographer” on The Orion’s staff, and won fifth place in a national photojournalism competition at the Associated Collegiate Press. In September 2014 she photographed at the front lines of the “Flood Wall Street” direct action and at environmental protests in New York, Pittsburgh, and throughout California. She’s spending this semester traveling and photographing in Europe.

“We were impressed with the high level of work in many of the submissions,” says Dennis Chamberlin, photography instructor in the Urbino Program and a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist. Chamberlin and photo instructors Susan Biddle and Robert Reeder reviewed the applicants. “It was difficult for the jury to choose only one winner because there were several portfolios that were quite strong.”

In Urbino, Orbegozo will study with Chamberlin and Susan Biddle, former Washington Post staff photographer and White House photographer. In Jerusalem, Teague will work with Linda Gradstein, formerly of National Public Radio; Ilene Prusher of The Jerusalem Post; and Cathy Shafran, who has worked in the Jerusalem bureaus of ABC, CNN, Associated Press Television News, Britain’s ITN, and Canada’s CTV.

“This has been a successful inaugural program for this scholarship,” says ieiMedia president and founder Andrew Ciofalo. “We will continue to offer it next year as part of our commitment to emphasizing the importance of photojournalism in our program. The excellence of our applicants this year resulted in our establishing the Foley Grant in the amount of $2,000 for distinguished runners up. We plan to continue this grant as well.”

How to Get the Most Out of a Media Study-Abroad Program

Nov 17, 2014   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Advice From the Pros, Jerusalem, Israel, Perpignan, France, Study Abroad, Urbino, Italy  //  1 Comment
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

After five summers of teaching abroad with ieiMedia, I’ve seen students take different approaches to the study-abroad experience. Some mostly stick with their compatriots; others dive into the local community, seeking out cultural challenges.

 Many of our students have described their experiences overseas as life-changing, but each year a few adventurous students get a little more out of it than others. Here are a few things I’ve learned from them:

ieiMedia Jerusalem alum Amara McLaughlin

Amara McLaughlin of Mt. Royal University published a story and photos in The Jerusalem Post.

1)   Be curious. Studying – and, even more, reporting — abroad gives you the opportunity to peak behind the curtain of people’s lives. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Inquire about customs, foods, fashions and traditions that seem foreign to you. Most of the time locals are happy to share their culture with you.

2)   Get to know your interpreters. Many of the ieiMedia interpreters are local students who are eager to practice their English and translation skills with visiting journalists. They can also offer a special window into their culture. One summer in Jerusalem, an interpreter invited me and a student to her family’s Old Jerusalem home to share the iftar break fast, the meal when Muslims end their daily Ramadan fast at sunset.  Over the course of that dinner of chicken and yellow, spice-infused rice, it became clear that though the family lived in a predominantly Jewish city, the American student and I were the first Jewish people to ever visit their home.  The interpreter’s mother and I didn’t speak each other’s language but, communicating through the young interpreter, we were able to forge a profound bond.

3)   Become a regular. One of the biggest differences between touring and living in a community is that you get a chance to get to know regular people – not just hotel clerks and tour guides but shopkeepers and baristas. In each place I’ve taught, I’ve tried to develop a relationship with local people. In Perpignan, it was with the woman who ran the produce store near my apartment. As my French improved we would have simple chats about her cat and what fruits were best that day. In Jerusalem, I developed a fondness for the fresh halva sold at Halva Kingdom in the Machane Yehuda Market, where the proprietor and I would debate which was the best flavor of the sesame candy – pistachio, cashew, chocolate or coffee.

4)   Network like crazy.  In most ieiMedia programs, students have an opportunity to meet with local and international media professionals. But each summer a few students go beyond the routine smile and handshake and parlay those meetings into professional opportunities. One summer in Urbino, San Francisco State University photography student Giovanna Borgna published photographs with the local newspaper, il Resto del Carlino. In 2013, Amara McLaughlin of Mt. Royal University published a story and photos in The Jerusalem Post. Maya Shwayder,  another Jerusalem student, so impressed the Post editors that she became the newspaper’s correspondent in New York and at the United Nations after she returned home. You can read her work on the newspaper’s website.

Study Abroad in Challenging Places

Nov 17, 2014   //   by Andy Ciofalo   //   Advice From the Pros, International Reporting, Istanbul, Turkey, Jerusalem, Israel, Study Abroad  //  No Comments
Andy Ciofalo (ieiMedia Founder and President) is professor emeritus of communication/ journalism at Loyola College Maryland, where he arrived in 1983 to found what is now The Communication Department.

Istanbul demonstrationTaksim Square in Istanbul was jammed with protestors as summer 2013 approached. Our students in international reporting were scheduled to arrive in mid-June. Unlike many study abroad programs conducted from the relative safety of overseas campuses, our journalism students were involved in an experiential program that emphasized reporting from the community.

While no parents or students expressed any concern to us, some on our faculty were uneasy. Are we putting our students in harm’s way?

The ieiMedia advance party, including our program director and a faculty member, reported back that beyond Taksim Tquare life was normal and peaceful in Istanbul. They even walked through Taksim Square and reported that the atmosphere and action was much calmer than the daily images crowding TV screens back in the U.S.

Any decision on the safety of a program should not be based on the tunnel vision provided by the market demands of American media. We not only rely on first-hand observations, but we are governed by the U.S. State Department’s warning system about travel to particular countries.

For our students, being in Istanbul at this time was a bonanza. They could compare for themselves the exaggerated coverage in the media to the actual situation on the ground. They nibbled at the edges of Taksim, under faculty supervision, and engaged protest leaders in depth interviews well away from the action. And they balanced their approach with reports showing how other issues continue to concern Istanbul citizens beyond the noise of Taksim. The incredible stories they produced can be found at our 2013 project site, The Battle for Istanbul.

As we prepare for 2015, once again we are observing Istanbul and Israel very closely. For instance, we know that in Jerusalem, like Istanbul, the action is limited to small geographic pinpoints. TV (Tunnel Vision) makes the situation seem larger than life, but of greater concern are individual, private acts of violence between citizens. We have the option to make program adjustments that keep us mostly on the Hebrew University’s highly secure campus and to function in areas far from the conflict zones.

The fact that our students can be so productive in a stressful environment speaks volumes on their resumes. But most important, such programs challenge them to rise above the usual soft features to get at the underlying problems in a society. This is experiential learning at its best.

For Summer 2015: Six Great Chances to Study Abroad

Oct 3, 2014   //   by Andy Ciofalo   //   International Reporting, Internships, Israel, Istanbul, Turkey, Jerusalem, Israel, Journalism Education, Multimedia, Multiplatform Journalism, Photography & Photojournalism, Scholarships, Study Abroad, Urbino, Italy, Video  //  No Comments
Andy Ciofalo (ieiMedia Founder and President) is professor emeritus of communication/ journalism at Loyola College Maryland, where he arrived in 1983 to found what is now The Communication Department.
Urbino Students

Multimedia students in Urbino, Italy.

 

“To be a reporter in Istanbul is to drop into the middle of the action.”

“This has been much more than a chance to live in Italy for a month–it’s been a chance to learn and apply valuable information that will make me more equipped for a professional career in media production.”

“I learned that journalism is so much more than disseminating news. It’s linking people from opposite sides of the world through a core human interest.”

These are the voices of ieiMedia’s 2014 students, who traveled this past summer to France, Spain, Italy, Turkey, and Northern Ireland to study multimedia journalism, narrative journalism, social media, international reporting, and creative writing. They produced videos, made photos, and reported and wrote about everything from flamenco and truffles to Syrian women in Turkey and the tension in Hebron.

Now we’re looking forward to next summer’s courses and to a new crop of equally inspired–and inspiring–students. And we’re hoping that your students, and perhaps you, will join us.

For summer 2015, we offer six international learning adventures:

In addition, we are proud to announce ieiMedia’s James Foley Memorial Scholarship in International Photojournalism in honor of the journalist tragically executed while covering the war in Syria. The winner of the $5,000 scholarship will attend our program in Urbino, Italy, to study with our award-winning photography faculty, including Pulitzer prize winner Dennis Chamberlin and former White House photographer Susan Biddle.

Keep in mind that our application deadline is February 1, 2015. Applications are considered on a rolling basis, and will close as each program is filled. Apply early to secure a spot!

Please share this information with your students, colleagues, and friends.

ieiMedia Students Set out for Summer Adventures

Jun 4, 2013   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Armagh, N. Ireland, Blog, International Reporting, Israel, Istanbul, Turkey, Jerusalem, Israel, Journalism Education, Urbino, Italy  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

Some 74 students and recent graduates from more than 50 universities in five countries will participate in ieiMedia programs this summer.

Students headed for the iPad magazine program in Urbino are busily packing their bags for a June 6 departure, while others bound for Armagh, Northern Ireland; Istanbul, Turkey; and Jerusalem, Israel still have a couple of weeks left for last-minute shopping, reading and information gathering.

Some tips for those planning to travel with ieiMedia this summer:

  • Read up on your destination city and the surrounding region. Consume international newspapers, magazines, books, guides, even novels about the place you’ll be living for a month. The more you know about the community, the better you’ll be able to report.
  • Morgan Brinlee, a student in ieiMedia's 2010 Perpignan program, developed a fascination with escargots during her summer in France.

    Come armed with story ideas. Do enough research that you have some idea of what you want to cover when you’re there.  Your faculty and translators will have some suggestions but the best ideas, the ones you really want to report on, will spring from your own interests. One of our strongest students in Perpignan a few years ago came to France knowing she wanted to report on escargots; indeed, she put together a fine multimedia story on a snail farm in nearby Estoher.
  • Pack lightly but bring a variety of summer-weight clothes. Remember to pack some casual business outfits (a dress, skirt or pantsuit for women; a nice shirt and slacks for men) for interviews and meetings with public officials, journalists and other professionals. Though it will be hot in many of our program sites, bring clothing that is modest and professional.
  • Bring sensible footwear. All of our program sites are in historic cities with cobble-stone streets and hilly areas. Forget the stiletto heels. Bring shoes you can walk in!
  • Carry a notebook and camera wherever you go. Even a casual conversation with a shopkeeper or resident could turn into an interview. Be prepared to take notes and shoot stills and video.
  • Get contact info for follow-up interviews. Collect business cards or names, phone numbers and email addresses for every person you talk with. Everyone is a potential source. You never know when you may want to go back to someone for more information.
  • Open your senses. Take a whiff of the air. Taste new foods. Try new experiences. Be open to what this new environment has to offer.
  • BUT don’t leave your common sense at home. Young travelers can occasionally get themselves into trouble by not paying attention to the warning signs they would follow at home. When possible, travel in pairs or small groups. Don’t go off with strangers. Know where your wallet, passport and other valuables are at all times. Be wary and aware of your surroundings.
  • Have a blast! ieiMedia programs are educational but they’re also fun. Many ieiMedia alumni describe their experiences with us as the summer of their lives. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to delve deep into a foreign community. Explore. Ask questions. Learn. Grow.

    Bon voyage from all of us at ieiMedia!

 

ieiMedia featured in J., Jewish weekly

Feb 12, 2013   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Blog, IEI Media in the News, Israel, Jerusalem, Israel, Journalism Education  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

ieiMedia’s Jerusalem program is featured in this week’s issue of J., the Jewish news weekly of Northern California.

The article  focuses on the power of experiential learning for teaching the craft of journalism.

“Certain aspects of writing and reporting can be taught in a classroom,” the article begins. “But any seasoned journalist can attest that some skills are gained only through on-the-ground experience — especially in a place that inspires as much media controversy as Israel.

“A new program from the Institute for Education in International Media (ieiMedia) aims to give college journalists exactly that.”

The Jerusalem program has already attracted attention from students around the world. Applications have come from the U.S., Canada and Australia and we’ve had inquiries from students in Brazil and Pakistan.

Scholarships for the program are still available. American students and international students at American universities can apply for scholarships of up to $1,000 from the Rothberg International School at The Hebrew University of Journalism. Canadian Friends of Hebrew University has agreed to make scholarships available for Canadian students.

Feb. 15 is the application deadline for program. Don’t have time to apply this week? Late applications will be accepted through March if slots are available.

Apply now to secure your spot!

 

Canadian Students: Scholarships Available for Summer Program in Israel

Jan 31, 2013   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Blog, Israel, Jerusalem, Israel, Scholarships, Uncategorized  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

We just got some great news for Canadian students: The Canadian Friends of The Hebrew University has agreed to make scholarships available for ieiMedia’s international reporting program in Jerusalem! 

Scholarships may vary in amount and will be awarded on the basis of need.

For more information about scholarships for Canadian students go to CFHU’s scholarships web page or contact:

Moshik Galanty
National Director, Student & Academic Affairs
Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
mgalanty@cfhu.org
.

Applications for the Jerusalem program are due March 30, 2013.

Crowdfunding Student Featured in USA Today College

Jan 16, 2013   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Blog, Israel, Jerusalem, Israel, Social Media  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

A Cabrini College student who is trying to raise money for ieiMedia’s summer international reporting program in Jerusalem was featured in an article in USA Today College about crowdfunding.

Brandon Desiderio

As you may remember from a previous post, Brandon Desiderio, a junior communication major, set up a crowdfunding campaign on Fund My Travel in early December, shortly after the crowd-financing site launched. He only collected $160 in the first six weeks it was up, but he’s hoping the mention on USA Today College will help with donations.

Within hours of the article’s posting, his fund was up to $296.

“Donations are starting to pour in from strangers,” he wrote in an email to ieiMedia.

Still, Desiderio knows it’s going to be tough to raise the money he needs. He plans to pump up his social media/PR campaign.

“Crowdfunding is practically built for our broke age group,” he told USA Today College, “but that doesn’t make it effortless or foolproof.”

 

Student plans to crowdfund his way to Jerusalem

Dec 3, 2012   //   by Rachele Kanigel   //   Blog, Israel, Jerusalem, Israel  //  No Comments
Rachele Kanigel is an associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University. She directed ieiMedia projects in Jerusalem (2013), Perpignan (2010 and 2011) and Urbino (2009) and taught reporting in Cagli in 2007. In 2017 she will co-direct ieiMedia's new international reporting program in Kyoto, Japan.

When Cabrini College junior Brandon Desiderio heard about ieiMedia’s summer international reporting program in Jerusalem, he knew he wanted to apply but he also knew he was going to need some financial help. So he decided to launch a crowdfunding campaign through Fund My Travel.

Brandon Desiderio

Fund My Travel is a new platform that helps people who want to study, volunteer or travel abroad raise funds for their adventures. Participants can create campaigns and then collect donations from friends, family members and others in their social network.

The site makes it easy for grandparents, teachers, friends, even strangers to help a student realize their personal and professional dreams. What could be a better holiday, birthday or graduation gift than a trip across the world?

ieiMedia partnered with Fund My Travel in November, just as the site was launching, with the hope of helping more students take advantage of this new form of financial aid.

Desiderio is the first ieiMedia student to try it out.

We tracked Desiderio down by email to find out more about this ambitious and resourceful young journalist.


Tell us a little about yourself — where you grew up, what you’re studying, extracurricular activities.

I’m a junior communication major at Cabrini College, which is 15 minutes from my hometown and 30 minutes outside of Philadelphia. My focus in communication, of course, is journalism – in particular, I’m passionate about international relations, foreign policy and humanitarian work. The Middle East is also a big interest of mine; I could read about the area, its history and culture, for days.

I’m the editor-in-chief of The Loquitur, our college’s weekly newspaper; the music director of our radio station; and vice president of social media for our collegiate chapter of Catholic Relief Services. My advocacy work with CRS has played an integral role in my education and in shaping my passion in journalism. This past Friday was my second time lobbying in Washington, D.C., on behalf of CRS and in light of the massive budget cuts that could affect its work and NGOs like it, should the “fiscal cliff” become a reality.

How did you get interested in journalism?

According to my mom, she’s always known that I would go into journalism – I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was 6. I was on my school newspaper in middle school, but between then and college, I’d never given the field much thought. I wanted to be a U.S. ambassador stationed somewhere exotic; for a while, I also wanted to be a screenwriter. I ended up “falling into” journalism, but I’ve loved every minute of it – even on the long nights when I want to turn off CNN, unfollow everyone in my Twitter feed and never look at another RSS feed for as long as I live… it’s been a journey that I’d never take back.

It sounds like you’re fascinated with the Middle East. What intrigues you about that part of the world?

It’s a lot of things – no easy answer here! I wanted to go into linguistics originally – and, even after taking five years of French in high school, romance languages weren’t really grabbing my attention. I began to develop a keen interest in areas that, to me, were way more fascinating: Africa and the Middle East. There were so many things I just didn’t know about the countries they held, their wealth of culture and peoples. For a while, this passion was put on the back burner as I handled my first year of college and my general ed classes.

In my sophomore year, as I began journalism, Occupy Wall Street became this huge, curious thing: a movement by the people, for the people. I wanted to know more about it, and so I reported on Occupy Philly the day it began – I pitched the idea to my editors, and they agreed to it. This was my first time interviewing people on-the-fly, without anything to base my questions on except, simply, “Why are you here?” and many other broad questions. I loved it; as I learned more, however, I came to realize the global context – and I discovered the Arab Spring.

I didn’t get to do anything on the Arab Spring, unfortunately, but my college did produce a multimedia website, YouthVoicesRise.com, in partnership with journalists at the American University in Cairo, as the protests continued to unfold – truly groundbreaking, inspiring stuff. I suppose I’m a bit jealous of them there!

Nevertheless, I continued to learn more: Syria, Libya, you name it. After the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, I had the chance to interview CRS’ director of the Middle East, Mark Schnellbaecher, and get his take on all of the unanswered questions – especially on Ambassador Rice’s early claim that the “Innocence of Muslims” trailer was what sparked the attack, which, of course, ended up being

Schnellbaecher, and get his take on all of the unanswered questions – especially on Ambassador Rice’s early claim that the “Innocence of Muslims” trailer was what sparked the attack, which, of course, ended up being unfounded. I’ve also been following the Israel-Palestine and Israel-Iran conflicts, which are just so crucial in our country’s past, present and future.

What’s cemented this passion of mine the most, however, is meeting my friend Rasha. She’s an Iraqi refugee, a very fascinating and determined young woman; she came to the U.S. when she was 16, chose to attend a private Catholic college and eventually became the president of our chapter of CRS. To me, she exemplifies the necessary unity that I’d never quite seen elsewhere – I still see Muslims as treated negatively by Americans, as with anyone of Arab or Persian descent. It’s women like Rasha, and like Malala Yousefzai, the Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban for just wanting an education, and Hanan Ashrawi, the first woman to be elected to the Palestinian National Council – these strong women of the Middle East are the reason why the region fascinates and compels me.

What are some of the challenges you’ve faced as editor of your college newspaper?
This year, we’ve really tried to cater to our readers, to redefine the newspaper not as a reflection of the industry, but as our own unique, exclusive product. From my experience, a lot of college newspapers forget that they’re the industry’s future – not the industry’s present standard, and definitely not its past. So we’ve experimented a lot this year, and our unconventional election front page was even listed alongside the likes of the Daily Princetonian, the Collegiate Times and the Daily Illini as one of the best election front pages in the country on College Media Matters… a HUGE triumph for our small private college. Huge!

Election coverage aside (which proved very difficult), it’s been an interesting road. I feel that I’ve grown so much since taking on this role – but the journey’s just begun. The election was a great framework for story ideas, but now we’re ready to tackle enterprise pieces and more strategic, creative work.

What are you planning to do with your career?

I’ve definitely realized that I want to pursue a career in journalism, although I’m much more interested in the creative “disruptors” of traditional journalism – outfits like Narrative.ly, ReadMatter.com, Longform.org and QZ.com are the kinds of journalistic pursuits I see myself heading towards.

Before my career pans out and bills must be paid, though, I’m pursuing something which I’ve had my heart set on: serving in the Peace Corps, perhaps in Jordan, which is the only country in the Middle East in which it actively operates… the rest, from there, is unknowable. At least for now.

How are you planning to publicize your Fund My Travel campaign?

Once my winter break begins, I plan to figure that out! Over the years I’ve connected with a number of great bloggers in different fields (primarily indie authors) who may allow me to guest-blog; social media will definitely be an indispensable tool for this crowdfunding campaign, too – particularly Twitter.

I’ll also be restarting my own blog in a more personal-development-focused area, as I’ve reached this self-actualization period of my life recently and, in my opinion, the blogosphere is already saturated with SEO-centric ploys that there’s hardly any personal, compelling content produced by bloggers these days. Bloggers are people, too, not just businesspeople vying for views!

 

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Students Say...

First, this month in Urbino can’t be described in a couple of sentences. The past four weeks immersed in Italian culture have helped me to grow both as a journalist and as a person, as an American. Working with interpreters and befriending locals has been the most valuable part of this experience. Memories from Urbino will forever hold a special place in my heart.
by Laura Weeks, James Madison University, Urbino Project 2012